12 Apr Susquehannock's newest model is happy as a clam in her throwback #CampGear, a present from Dara and Seth R. #S4bebes

Susquehannock's newest model is happy as a clam in her throwback #CampGear, a present from Dara and Seth R.  #S4bebes

10 Apr All alumni and friends of Susquehannock 18+ are invited to volunteer at Work Week 🚜🛠️ as we prepare the facilities for #Summer114. Stay for the entire two weeks, come for a few days, make multiple visits! We kindly ask all volunteers to sign up online: susquehannock.com️Alumni️2019 Work WeekEmail jbell@susquehannock with questions or for more info "The More You Eat, The More You Get Paid." -Buff Weigand

All alumni and friends of Susquehannock 18+ are invited to volunteer at Work Week 🚜🛠️ as we prepare the facilities for #Summer114. Stay for the entire two weeks, come for a few days, make multiple visits! We kindly ask all volunteers to sign up online: susquehannock.com️Alumni️2019 Work WeekEmail jbell@susquehannock with questions or for more info "The More You Eat, The More You Get Paid." -Buff Weigand

06 Apr Rafael Nadal speaks to the value of multi-sport diversification: "One of the successes in my career is that I did not just play Tennis and I did not miss any childhood things because of Tennis. I traveled, I could play sports like Golf and Football (Soccer)."#WordsofWisdom

Rafael Nadal speaks to the value of multi-sport diversification: "One of the successes in my career is that I did not just play Tennis and I did not miss any childhood things because of Tennis. I traveled, I could play sports like Golf and Football (Soccer)."#WordsofWisdom

04 Apr Coach's Corner: "Variety is the Spice…"This old adage pertains to athletic training more than we realize. The most recent studies of brain function related to skill development and memory suggest that to develop skills faster that are retained longer in our memory, we need to embrace variety in our training programs.Every time we try a new skill, our brain recognizes that we have used a new set of neural pathways. While sleeping our brains insulate the neural pathway used for that new skill by wrapping the nerves with myelin – the gray matter in our brains. This process is called "myelination." The thicker that insulation gets, the faster the electrical impulse travels, and the faster and easier we perform that particular skill. After a while, that skill becomes easy – what we commonly refer to as "muscle memory." Well, it's not happening in the muscles, it's myelination occurring in our brains.Myelination does not occur at an even pace, however. When the skill you were trying to develop is difficult, the brain recognizes this struggle and begins to myelinate. When the skill becomes easy, myelination slows down along that nerve pathway. In order to keep improving, you must always increase the challenge so the brain recognizes struggle and continues myelinating.Training Suggestions…Identify the skills you wish to learnBreak them down into the smallest parts, work on the smallest parts separately before putting them together (increasing the challenges)Example: driving to the basket for a lay-up might involve:1. a jab step fake2. ripping the ball from left to right3. getting your first step past the defender4. taking a power step and dribble to the hoop, lifting off with one leg and extending to full height with the opposite hand5. releasing the lay-up with wrist release action much like any other shotChoose several different sets of skills1. Dribbling2. Throwing fakes3. Shooting VarietyOver the course of a training session, focus on one main skill (wrist release) then add two other sidebar skills (dribbling and jab step fake)Check your email for a sample training session that embraces these techniques

Coach's Corner: "Variety is the Spice…"This old adage pertains to athletic training more than we realize. The most recent studies of brain function related to skill development and memory suggest that to develop skills faster that are retained longer in our memory, we need to embrace variety in our training programs.Every time we try a new skill, our brain recognizes that we have used a new set of neural pathways. While sleeping our brains insulate the neural pathway used for that new skill by wrapping the nerves with myelin – the gray matter in our brains. This process is called "myelination." The thicker that insulation gets, the faster the electrical impulse travels, and the faster and easier we perform that particular skill. After a while, that skill becomes easy – what we commonly refer to as "muscle memory." Well, it's not happening in the muscles, it's myelination occurring in our brains.Myelination does not occur at an even pace, however. When the skill you were trying to develop is difficult, the brain recognizes this struggle and begins to myelinate. When the skill becomes easy, myelination slows down along that nerve pathway. In order to keep improving, you must always increase the challenge so the brain recognizes struggle and continues myelinating.Training Suggestions...Identify the skills you wish to learnBreak them down into the smallest parts, work on the smallest parts separately before putting them together (increasing the challenges)Example: driving to the basket for a lay-up might involve:1. a jab step fake2. ripping the ball from left to right3. getting your first step past the defender4. taking a power step and dribble to the hoop, lifting off with one leg and extending to full height with the opposite hand5. releasing the lay-up with wrist release action much like any other shotChoose several different sets of skills1. Dribbling2. Throwing fakes3. Shooting VarietyOver the course of a training session, focus on one main skill (wrist release) then add two other sidebar skills (dribbling and jab step fake)Check your email for a sample training session that embraces these techniques

30 Mar "Time and health are two precious assets that we don't recognize and appreciate until they have been depleted."-Denis Waitley#WordsofWisdom

"Time and health are two precious assets that we don't recognize and appreciate until they have been depleted."-Denis Waitley#WordsofWisdom